Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

Revealed: Worst commuter city in the UK… but it’s NOT London

0

A new study claims to have revealed the best and worst commuter cities in the UK and ‘worst’ top spot is not where you would expect.

With its overcrowded tube carriages, endless queues and high costs, many Brits would bet on London to win this title by a mile.

But, surprisingly, the English capital comes in second place, with Edinburgh taking the number one spot.

The research was compiled by Capital on Tap, who analysed 30 of the most populated cities across the UK to highlight the best and worst. 

They looked at a variety of difference factors, including average length of commute per week, the average cost of a monthly travel pass and even how happy the residents are.

A new study claims to have revealed the best and worst commuter cities in the UK - however, people are baffled by the top spot (stock image)

A new study claims to have revealed the best and worst commuter cities in the UK – however, people are baffled by the top spot (stock image)

The research was compiled by Capital on Tap, who analysed 30 of the most populated cities across the UK to highlight the best and worst

The research was compiled by Capital on Tap, who analysed 30 of the most populated cities across the UK to highlight the best and worst

With both the longest commute per week (11 and a half hours) and most days spent travelling to work (75 per year), Edinburgh is firmly in the number one spot on the worst commuter cities list.

In second place is London, where the average weekly commute time is 7.83 hours per week or 51 days per year.

Although there is around four hours difference per week between the Scottish and English capitals, London is significantly more expensive.

The average monthly travel pass will set you back around £182.28, whereas it’s less than half of that figure in Edinburgh, with the cost of £59.93.

The West Midlands goes on to dominate the bad list, with Wolverhampton, Coventry and Stoke-on-Trent in third, fourth and fifth.

All three cities have an average weekly commute time of 7.30 hours or 47 days per year.

However, Coventry has the cheapest travel pass of £49.16, with Wolverhamptom costing £60 per month and Stoke-on-Trent costing £65 per month. 

It’s actually the ‘resident hapiness index’ that brings Wolverhampton up, with a score of 7.49, compared to Coventry (7.45) and Stoke-on-Trent (7.32). 

Worst commuter cities in the UK

1. Edinburgh (11.52 hours per week / 75 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £59.93)

2. London (7.83 hours per week / 51 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £182.28)

3. Wolverhampton (7.30 hours per week / 47 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £60)

4. Coventry (7.30 hours per week / 47 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £49.16)

5. Stoke-on-Trent (7.30 hours per week / 47 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £65)

Best commuter cities in the UK

1. Belfast (0.58 hours per week / 4 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £59.53)

2. Sunderland (5.09 hours per week, 33 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £27)

3. Leeds (5.30 hours per week, 34 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £75)

4. Kingston upon Hull (5.30 hours per week, 34 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £55.50)

5. Sheffield (5.30 hours per week, 34 days per year – average monthly travel pass: £68.83)

On the other side of the scale, according to the research, the number one best commuter city in the UK is Belfast.

The Northern Irish city has a very low commute time per week of just 0.58 hours or four days each year, coupled with a relatively cheap monthly travel cost of £59.53.

In second place is Sunderland, with 5.09 hours of travelling per week, 33 days per year and an average monthly travel pass cost of £27.

Meanwhile, Leeds, Kingston upon Hull and Sheffield all also make it onto the good list.

The research comes just after another new study revealed that walking to work every day could slash your risk of a heart attack – but only if it’s a fairly lengthy stroll.

New research shows workers who commute by foot for at least 45 minutes in total – or just over 20 minutes each way – have better cardiovascular health than those relying on cars or public transport.

Blood tests revealed they had much lower levels of C-reactive protein, a harmful molecule known to be linked with a raised risk of blood clots that can cause heart attacks and strokes.

Elevated CRP levels can indicate dangerous inflammation in arteries supplying the heart and brain with oxygen-rich blood.

It’s well known that regular brisk walking is good for the heart, but researchers at the University of Eastern Finland wanted to see how much time workers need to spend commuting by foot to reap the benefits.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.