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​CHRISTOPHER STEVENS WEEKEND TV: Why the Just Stop Oil clowns should scoff Aero bars instead

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Inside The Factory

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Wilderness With Simon Reeve 

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Finally, a Net Zero initiative we can all support. By scoffing chocolate bars in unlimited quantities, we can save the planet . . . but it isn’t just any chocs.

Visiting the Nestle facility in York on Inside The Factory (BBC2), Gregg Wallace discovered that the bubbles in Aero bars are created by injecting liquid carbon dioxide into peppermint flavoured gloop. 

When the CO2 reaches atmospheric pressure, it becomes a gas, creating the bubbles that give Aero its name. Carbon dioxide is the dreaded greenhouse gas that causes global warming, and what better form of carbon capture than to encase it in milk chocolate?

All those Just Stop Oil numpties can stop glueing themselves to the M25 and munch a lorryload of chocolate instead. Just Stop Dieting: if you want to show how much you care about the environment, stuff your face. It’s not self-indulgence, it’s science!

Visiting the Nestle facility in York on Inside The Factory (BBC2), Gregg Wallace (pictured) discovered that the bubbles in Aero bars are created by injecting liquid carbon dioxide into peppermint flavoured gloop.

Visiting the Nestle facility in York on Inside The Factory (BBC2), Gregg Wallace (pictured) discovered that the bubbles in Aero bars are created by injecting liquid carbon dioxide into peppermint flavoured gloop.

When the CO2 reaches atmospheric pressure, it becomes a gas, creating the bubbles that give Aero its name. Carbon dioxide is the dreaded greenhouse gas that causes global warming, and what better form of carbon capture than to encase it in milk chocolate?

When the CO2 reaches atmospheric pressure, it becomes a gas, creating the bubbles that give Aero its name. Carbon dioxide is the dreaded greenhouse gas that causes global warming, and what better form of carbon capture than to encase it in milk chocolate?

Gregg was leaping around as always like a schoolboy who has already wolfed a half-pound bar of fruit and nut, as he inspected the machinery. ‘The size of those rollers!’ he marvelled. ‘Hey, that’s genius stuff! Clever!’

And there were the usual cascades of statistics: 80,000 bubbles in every bar, and enough bars produced every day to stretch from York to Grimsby, or about 50 miles.

Insights of the weekend:

BBC iPlayer is dotted with intriguing shows that haven’t yet aired on terrestrial. One is a probing psychological series of 15-minute shorts, Imposter Syndrome. In it, Bradley Wiggins tells why he destroyed his Sports Personality of the Year trophy. Stroppy-chops.

Earlier this month, the 59-year-old former greengrocer from Peckham courted mockery with an account of his average Saturday. This included nipping into his local gym before official opening hours to enjoy a swim on his own, followed by breakfast in a Harvester pub, plus an early lunch, and an hour or two spent playing with his four-year-old son, Sid.

Then he likes to shut himself in his study to play a video game set in the Dark Ages, which satisfies his passion for history, or so he claims.

Why anyone would care what Gregg or any other telly host does on a day off beats me. But I do know that the reality will be very different: Sid is severely autistic and can’t talk. For both his parents, that will be exhausting and stressful beyond description.

If Gregg copes by playing video games, or if he just made that up to preserve his family’s privacy, then either way it’s none of anybody’s business.

The chocolate factory trip will be his last on the show, though here, too, there are different interpretations. Gregg says he needs to spend more time helping his wife Anne-Marie with their son.

But other accounts claimed his banter offended some of the female staff at Nestle’s, with allegedly derogatory comments about their weight. Gregg denies that, but told Richard Madeley on Good Morning Britain: ‘I thought it was a good time to give something up.’

The chocolate factory trip will be his last on the show, though here, too, there are different interpretations. Gregg says he needs to spend more time helping his wife Anne-Marie with their son

The chocolate factory trip will be his last on the show, though here, too, there are different interpretations. Gregg says he needs to spend more time helping his wife Anne-Marie with their son

Here’s hoping this doesn’t mean the end of the show, which can deliver entertaining peeps into manufacturing processes, when it isn’t getting too bogged down with numbers. There must be another loud and bouncy Cockney presenter to fill Gregg’s boots. What’s Bradley Walsh doing these days, is he busy?

Don’t ask Simon Reeve. The only manufacturing processes that get him excited are decidedly more primitive. He watched in fascination on Wilderness (BBC2) as a San tribal elder in the Kalahari taught children how to hunt for poisonous beetles and squeeze their toxic pulp onto arrows.

‘If you can’t do this,’ he said, ‘you will be useless. You will not be able to kill an animal and you will die of hunger.’ There’s no nonsense in a San classroom.

Simon joined the men on a wildebeest hunt, drinking strong coffee late at night to stay awake and listen for lions. What an adventure this series has been.

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