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Majorca and Ibiza hit with BOOZE BAN as islands crack down on tourists

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THE Balearic islands have been hit with a devastating booze ban after 9.30pm which is expected to be enforced immediately.

Sunny holiday hotspots Majorca and Ibiza are set to have drinking alcohol in public at night prohibited as part of the islands’ efforts to curb excess tourism.

Brit tourists drinking while enjoying a football match in one of the sports bars in Majorca

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Brit tourists drinking while enjoying a football match in one of the sports bars in MajorcaCredit: Alamy
Young Brit tourists covered in foam while enjoying a holiday on the Spanish island

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Young Brit tourists covered in foam while enjoying a holiday on the Spanish islandCredit: Alamy
Protestors in Majorca demanding a restriction on 'cheap tourism'

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Protestors in Majorca demanding a restriction on ‘cheap tourism’Credit: Arran Països Catalans
Angry locals took to the streets to demand a cap on tourist numbers

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Angry locals took to the streets to demand a cap on tourist numbersCredit: Alamy
Despite the furious protests, Brits are still flocking to the popular hotspot

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Despite the furious protests, Brits are still flocking to the popular hotspotCredit: Alamy

The new rule that sees the “total ban of the sale of alcohol between 9.30pm and 8am” in resorts defined as areas of excessive tourism has been approved today.

The measure will apply to most affected by the high number of tourists such as Llucmajor, Palma, Calvia (Magalluf) and Sant Antoni in Ibiza.

The strict rule will be in place at least until December 31, 2027.

Authorities in the Balearic Islands also announced that “commercial establishments” would be shut down completely between the time period as introduced in the ban.

The new rules include a prohibition on organising drinking parties in communal spaces – and bans graffiti, riding scooters and displaying nudism.

Offenders will face more serious consequences if they are found disrupting harmony on the streets and public roads after drinking alcohol.

Jaime Martínez, mayor of Mallorca’s capital, Palma, said that these laws will help them “correct uncivil attitudes” that are often displayed by tourists in the city.

He added that offenders breaching rules could be fined up to £2,600 – and more rules are to be revealed in the coming months.

Fines under the new laws

AUTHORITIES in Majorca are cracking down on tourits by imposing fresh bans on drinking in public and graffiti vandalism.

Any tourist breaching the new rules could be slapped with a fine of £1,300.

The penalty can be increased up to £2,600, in case the grounds of the offence are more serious.

Fines for graffiti, vandalism and loud slogans have also been increased to £2,600.

If minors are found to commit graffiti vandalism, their parents will be held responsible – and will be forced to pay the fine amount.

Flooding the streets with banners, posters and advertising brochures is now prohibited,

Destroying listed buildings, monuments, and other important public areas would be considered a serious offence – and could attract fines up to £2,600.

Meanwhile, the Committee of Tourism, Trade, Employment, Culture and Sport has reportedly approved an initiative to reintroduce a cap on cruise ships to Palma, the island’s capital.

The proposal calls on the Balearic Government to reach an agreement with the cruise lines and shipping agents, the Majorca Daily Bulletin reports.

The approval of the Balearic Islands Port Authority (APB) and Palma City Council will also be required to renew the agreement on limiting the arrival of cruise ships in the port of Palma.

Majorca is now determined to find ways to curb mass tourism.

Member of Palma XXI association Jaume Garau said: “There is a general feeling that we’ve gone too far and have to turn back.”

Speaking during a presentation for an upcoming congress on tourism to be held by the Civil Society Forum, Garau stressed the issues the Balearic islands are facing due to the high number of tourists.

Thousands of anti-tourist protesters take to the streets in Tenerife as they demand freeze on holidaymakers

He explained that the purpose of the congress is to prepare a proposal, alongside locals and civil associations, to establish a sustainable tourism model.

He warned: “There will come a time when people here won’t be able to go anywhere.”

The initial document proposes measures to lower the number of visitors such as the reduction of the rental car fleet, following the example of Formentera, or the implementation of a tourist tax.

Other key issues the forum has addressed were the reduction of tourist accommodation places, the conservation of protected natural spaces and the water cycle.

Another forum member, Margalida Ramis said: “Tourism must decrease and reconvert.”

Majorca’s plan comes after thousands took to the streets in Tenerife last month to demand restrictions on holidaymakers.

More than 15,000 people waved Canary Islands’ flags and blew horns to make a deafening noise in the capital Santa Cruz.

Residents said they are “fed-up” with “low quality” Brits who only come for the cheap beer, burgers and sunbathing.

Messages in English left on walls and benches in and around the resort read “My misery your paradise” and “Average salary in Canary Islands is 1,200 euros.”

But the Canary Islands president Fernando Clavijo expressed his concern over the growing anti-tourism movement and begged holidaymakers to keep coming.

Anti-tourist measures sweeping hotspots

A WAVE of anti-tourist measures are being implemented across Europe to curb mass tourism in popular holiday hotspots.

Overcrowding has become the main problem in many sunny destinations, with authorities trying to find a solution to keep tourists and locals happy.

Officials have attempted to reduce the impact of holidaymakers by implementing additional taxes on tourists, or banning new hotels.

Earlier this year Venice became the first city in the world to charge an entry fee for holidaymakers after it started charging day-trippers €5 (£4.30) if visiting the historical Italian centre.

It was followed by an area in Barcelona which resorted to removing a well-used bus route from Apple and Google Maps to stop crowds of tourists from using the bus.

 Meanwhile, San Sebastián in the north of Spain, limited the maximum number of people on guided visits to 25 to avoid congestion, noise, nuisance and overcrowding.

The city has already banned the construction of new hotels.

The Spanish government has allowed restaurants to charge customers more for sitting in the shade in Andalucia.

Benidorm has introduced time restrictions, as swimming in the sea between midnight and 7am could cost a whopping £1,000.

The Canary Islands are also considering adopting measures to regulate the number of visitors – and charge tourists a daily tax.

Greece has already enforced a tourist tax during the high season (from March to October) with visitors expected to pay from €1 (£0.86) to €4 (£3.45) per night, depending on the booked accommodation.

Officials in Santiago de Compostela in Galicia want to introduce a fee for travellers to remind people to be courteous during their trips.

Thousands of people demonstrate against tourism policies on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain

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Thousands of people demonstrate against tourism policies on the island of Tenerife, Canary Islands, Spain
A growing anti-tourist movement has swept the islands in recent months

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A growing anti-tourist movement has swept the islands in recent months
Hostile messages against foreigners can be found on the walls

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Hostile messages against foreigners can be found on the walls
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