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Majorca’s war on tourism: 9.30pm alcohol curfew is needed to make Magaluf safer, says mayor, as Palma now vows to bring in tougher measures to lower tourist numbers

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As Majorca’s war on tourism wages on, Magaluf’s mayor said a 9.30pm alcohol curfew is needed to make the island safer, while Palma vowed to introduce tougher measures to lower tourist numbers.

Crackdowns on over-tourism have been erupting across a series of Spanish islands as they face severe overcrowding and immense spikes in the numbers of boozy holidaymakers.

The popular holiday hotspot Magaluf introduced alcohol restrictions in some areas of the island which have now been eased as part of the Balearic government’s new revised law on responsible tourism which aims to outlaw excessive drinking on the island, as well as Playa de Palma and San Antonio in Ibiza.

The three party resorts have been divided into zones where the restrictions are in force, and shops that sell alcohol in these areas must also be closed by 9.30pm.

But under revised plans, unveiled by the conservative Partido Popular government, although the areas where the booze restrictions are in force have been reduced, it is now illegal to drink in the street in those areas.

These new measures were fully supported by the Mayor of Calvia, Juan Antonio Amengual, who stated they would make the island a safer place to be enjoyed by all.

Magaluf's mayor has welcomed a series of measures that bans the sale of alcohol in shops after 9.30pm and stops drinking booze in the streets

Magaluf’s mayor has welcomed a series of measures that bans the sale of alcohol in shops after 9.30pm and stops drinking booze in the streets

Crackdowns on over-tourism have been erupting across a series of Spanish islands as they face severe overcrowding and immense spikes in the numbers of boozy holidaymakers

Crackdowns on over-tourism have been erupting across a series of Spanish islands as they face severe overcrowding and immense spikes in the numbers of boozy holidaymakers

The initial law was introduced by the previous government, but some changes have been introduced.

The new Decree for Responsible Tourism and the Improvement of Quality in Tourist Areas states the consumption of alcoholic beverages on public roads is prohibited, with the exception of terraces or legally authorised areas.

Penalties for non-compliance with the prohibition of alcohol consumption on public roads will range from €500 to €1,500 (£430 to £1,290).

Rules have already been in place banning public drinking in certain popular holiday destinations across the Balearic islands but the latest measures represent a tightening of existing laws and the potential for increased fines.

The original alcohol measures, which were passed in 2020, saw restrictions on the number of free drinks that package holidays could offer, as well as new rules on public nudity and climbing across hotel balconies.

The new laws will be enforced until at least December 2027.

It is now also forbidden to pick up or disembark boat party passengers within the areas affected by the Decree, reports the Majorca Daily Bulletin.

The need for stricter measures have also spread to neighbouring Palma as Marga Prohens, the president of the Balearic government said in a statement last week that ‘the Balearic Islands have reached their limit’.

He vowed to demand measures against tourist overcrowding, including ‘regulating the number of rental cars, not expanding the Palma airport and committing to a tourism model that reduces the number of visitors and the environmental footprint’.

Last week, the Spanish Socialist Workers’ Party (PSOE) of Palma highlighted the existence of around 800 illegal holiday rental homes in the municipality alone, according to Ultima Hora.

Francisco Ducros, a spokesperson within the City Council said: ‘Citizens no longer want the situation we are experiencing: without solutions in terms of housing, without proposals to improve the lives of residents or the neighborhoods of Palma’.

Shops in tourist hotspots like Magaluf have been banned from selling alcohol between 9.30pm and 8am since 2020 as part of legislation that the regional government claimed was the first of its kind

Shops in tourist hotspots like Magaluf have been banned from selling alcohol between 9.30pm and 8am since 2020 as part of legislation that the regional government claimed was the first of its kind

A view of Palma Beach stuffed full of tourists and locals in Palma Majorca, the Balearic islands, as the the president of the Balearic government vowed to demand measures against tourist overcrowding, including 'regulating the number of rental cars, not expanding the Palma airport and committing to a tourism model that reduces the number of visitors and the environmental footprint'

A view of Palma Beach stuffed full of tourists and locals in Palma Majorca, the Balearic islands, as the the president of the Balearic government vowed to demand measures against tourist overcrowding, including ‘regulating the number of rental cars, not expanding the Palma airport and committing to a tourism model that reduces the number of visitors and the environmental footprint’

It comes after a series of crackdowns across several other Spanish islands as they battle overcrowding and immense spikes in tourism.

Last week, a Menorca holiday village dubbed the ‘Spanish Mykonos’ threatened to ban all tourists after previously telling them to only visit between 11am and 8pm so they can enjoy their breakfasts.

Ibiza also became the latest Spanish holidaymaker hotspot to join in with growing anti-tourism protests that have erupted around the country.

‘We welcome anybody who wants to enjoy our local culture, gastronomy, local traditions, beautiful beaches and covers,’ said Xaquelina Ana Perry, a spokeswoman for an activist group by the name of Prou Eivissa (Enough Ibiza).

‘We are only against the massification of the type of tourism attracted to our island. The island is saturated, especially with illegal renting and our 572 square kilometres cannot take anymore,’ she added.

Similar protesting has been seen in other popular destinations, such as Tenerife, where furious locals even went on hunger strike in an effort to voice their anger.

The words 'Go Home Tourist' were scrawled in English over a wall underneath a real estate promotion billboard in Nou Llevant, Mallorca, a neighbourhood that has seen a massive influx of foreign buyers over the past few years

The words ‘Go Home Tourist’ were scrawled in English over a wall underneath a real estate promotion billboard in Nou Llevant, Mallorca, a neighbourhood that has seen a massive influx of foreign buyers over the past few years

Graffiti reading 'My misery, your paradise' is seen in the Balearic Islands

Graffiti reading ‘My misery, your paradise’ is seen in the Balearic Islands

Spanish islands are threatened by sea pollution, traffic gridlock and lack of cheap affordable housing linked to the pushing-up of property prices because of Airbnb-style holiday lets

Spanish islands are threatened by sea pollution, traffic gridlock and lack of cheap affordable housing linked to the pushing-up of property prices because of Airbnb-style holiday lets

In Menorca, graffiti has also sprung up on walls telling tourists to ‘go home’, while in Marbella last year, tyres on cars with British number plates were slashed. 

On April 20, thousands of protestors took to the streets of the Canary Islands to protest against the problems caused by mass tourism and demand their politicians take action. 

The protestors chanted the slogan: ‘Canarias tiene un limite’, which in English translates as ‘The Canary Islands have a limit.’

Two weeks ago the same words appeared painted in white on the tarmac of one of the access roads to Mount Teide in Tenerife.

Another message painted on the road said: ‘Moratoria turistica’ – ‘Tourist moratorium’ in English.’

Majorcan-based hotel chief Joan Pla warned recently the mass tourism protests in the Canary Islands could be repeated in the Balearics.

He claimed the number of homes built for local residents that were being purchased instead by foreigners as holiday properties was a problem.

And he complained islands like Majorca where he is based were having to cope with the influx of too many people at certain times of the year.

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