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Ex-Qantas pilot says airline went through a ‘perfect storm’ after returning five flights in a week

Inside Qantas’ week of HELL: how a perfect storm of events created utter chaos for the airline – and the big mistake the airline made last year

  • Ex-pilot weighed in on Qantas planes turning around
  • Richard de Crespigny spoke of a ‘perfect storm’ of events

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Qantas has been forced to return five of its planes in less than a week due to a ‘perfect storm’ of events, a decorated pilot claimed.

Richard de Crespigny admitted that “things go wrong all the time in aviation” as he explained the disastrous week for the airline.

The first Qantas plane to return was a flight from Auckland to Sydney, with pilots issuing a distress call on Wednesday.

Richard de Crespigny admitted ‘things always go wrong in aviation’ as he weighed in on the airline’s disastrous week

The first Qantas plane to return was a flight from Auckland to Sydney, with pilots issuing a distress call on Wednesday

The first Qantas plane to return was a flight from Auckland to Sydney, with pilots issuing a distress call on Wednesday

The first Qantas plane to return was a flight from Auckland to Sydney, with pilots issuing a distress call on Wednesday

The second was a flight from Sydney to Fiji on Thursday, the third was a flight from Melbourne to Sydney on Friday and the fourth was a flight to Canberra later that day.

The most recent was a Qantas jet en route from Fiji to Sydney where the crew turned around on Sunday after noticing smoke in the cabin.

“To be fair to Qantas, this is kind of a perfect storm of things going wrong, and a lot of them aren’t that important,” Crespigny told Channel Nine’s Today on Monday.

‘In aviation things always go wrong. That’s why we have two pilots in the cockpit.’

Mr Crespigny compared the current media coverage to when Qantas experienced its worst aviation disaster in November 2010.

A Qantas Airbus A380 had left Singapore Changi Airport and was on its way to Sydney before suffering an unrelenting engine failure four minutes after takeoff.

Mr. Crespigny was the pilot of the aircraft, QF32, and there were 440 passengers and 29 crew members on board.

Thick smoke billowed from the left wing, which Mr. Crespigny to navigate back to the airfield and make an emergency landing.

Flight QF1516 from Melbourne to Canberra was forced to turn back after pilots noticed a problem with the flaps on the Boeing 717 aircraft (pictured is the plane's route on Friday morning)

Flight QF1516 from Melbourne to Canberra was forced to turn back after pilots noticed a problem with the flaps on the Boeing 717 aircraft (pictured is the plane's route on Friday morning)

Flight QF1516 from Melbourne to Canberra was forced to turn back after pilots noticed a problem with the flaps on the Boeing 717 aircraft (pictured is the plane’s route on Friday morning)

A fully booked Qantas plane en route from Melbourne to Sydney has been forced to turn around mid-flight, just days after another plane issued a distress call.

A packed Qantas plane en route from Melbourne to Sydney had to turn back mid-flight just days after another plane issued a distress call.

A packed Qantas plane en route from Melbourne to Sydney had to turn back mid-flight just days after another plane issued a distress call.

The veteran pilot was asked if the airline’s recent blunders had anything to do with Qantas’ recent budget cuts.

“We need to look at every critical aspect of aviation, from catering to engineering,” he said.

“We trust engineers to do a good job, the fuel is loaded, the luggage is loaded, so you have to look at all that input.”

Mr Crespigny was critical of Qantas’ $400 million share buyback in September, saying the money could have been spent on its employees.

“I think maybe people would look back on the fact that maybe it wasn’t the best idea to allocate $400 million for a shared buyback instead of securing these critical assets at a time when the airline is growing,” he said. he.

Mr Crespigny was critical of Qantas buying back its shares for $400m in September, saying the money could have been spent on its employees (stock image)

Mr Crespigny was critical of Qantas buying back its shares for $400 million in September, saying the money could have been spent on its employees (stock image)

Mr Crespigny was critical of Qantas buying back its shares for $400 million in September, saying the money could have been spent on its employees (stock image)

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