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Pest exterminator Ricky Clark has been labeled a ‘serial killer’ of African wildlife

Anti-hunting activists have branded TV pied piper Ricky Clark a “serial killer” in a campaign to support a bill that could ban the importation of body parts from animals hunted abroad.

The Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting has placed advertisements outside parliament and train stations saying that Clark, 46, is ‘one of Britain’s most prolific serial killers’ and ‘still on the loose’.

An undercover investigation revealed the hunter – who starred in the BBC One program The Rat Pack – has made 20 safaris in at least 11 African countries and committed more than 100 murders, The Times reported.

He also has a trophy room filled with over 50 of his kills, including a wide variety of animal species such as lions, hippos, leopards and more.

Clark’s hunting hobby is completely legal, but the importation of animal bodies could soon be banned under the proposed law. MPs are expected to begin debate on the legislation tomorrow.

TV Pied Piper Ricky Clark (pictured) was branded a ‘serial killer’ by the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting in a recent ad in support of a bill that could ban the importation of body parts from animals hunted abroad

Clark has hunted all over the world, including in Africa, Kyrgyzstan, Canada, Hungary, Finland, Spain, France and the Czech Republic.

He reportedly told an undercover investigator from the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting that he shot two leopards, which the group claims are in danger of extinction.

“I shot one in self-defense from eight yards. I shot him in the nose,” Clark recalled of a trip to Namibia, according to The Times.

“I was chasing something else and he came for me.”

He hunted the second leopard on a later safari in Zambia. During that trip, he also reportedly shot a hippopotamus to use as bait.

“Four ace was hit by big toms, so it was a choice of which tom to shoot,” he explained.

Mr Clark said he and his team built a hunter shelter and then shot the leopard ‘out of the tree’ on the first night of the trip.

He recalled, “That was an incredible experience. I shot buffalo, big bushbuck, a civet, a leopard and a hyena and some impalas and some other shit.”

MailOnline has approached Mr Clark, the BBC and the Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting for comment.

An undercover investigation revealed Mr Clark - who starred in the BBC One program The Rat Pack - has made 20 safaris in at least 11 African countries and committed more than 100 murders.  He is pictured with his brother Jimmy on The Rat Pack

An undercover investigation revealed Mr Clark - who starred in the BBC One program The Rat Pack - has made 20 safaris in at least 11 African countries and committed more than 100 murders.  He is pictured with his brother Jimmy on The Rat Pack

An undercover investigation revealed Mr Clark – who starred in the BBC One program The Rat Pack – has made 20 safaris in at least 11 African countries and committed more than 100 murders. He is pictured with his brother Jimmy on The Rat Pack

Mr Clark has a trophy room filled with over 50 of his prey, including a wide variety of animal species such as lions, hippos, leopards and more

Mr Clark has a trophy room filled with over 50 of his prey, including a wide variety of animal species such as lions, hippos, leopards and more

Mr Clark has a trophy room filled with over 50 of his prey, including a wide variety of animal species such as lions, hippos, leopards and more

Mr Clark is one of television’s most beloved fighters. The Rat Pack, which showed how his city-based pest control company used dogs to remove rodents from homes, received “favorable” reviews when it launched in 2009.

The program aired in the UK and on TV stations as far away as Australia.

The fighter also has a popular YouTube channel with videos of his pest control successes. One clip, in which his plummer terrier Kimber kills a large rat, has been viewed more than five million times.

He also appeared on the popular American TV channel CNN in a report about the ‘working life’ of a Pied Piper.

In addition, Mr Clark claims to be a member of the exclusive hunting syndicate at the Royal Family’s Sandringham estate in Norfolk.

He reportedly said he joined the group after becoming acquainted with a game warden in the area and that he “saw King Charles about three weeks ago.”

The hunter also claimed that the group will “hunt around William’s house.”

The Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting has placed advertisements outside parliament and train stations saying that Clark, 46, is 'one of Britain's most prolific serial killers' and 'still on the loose'.  Pictured: One of the group's advertisements on a van outside the Houses of Parliament

The Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting has placed advertisements outside parliament and train stations saying that Clark, 46, is 'one of Britain's most prolific serial killers' and 'still on the loose'.  Pictured: One of the group's advertisements on a van outside the Houses of Parliament

The Campaign to Ban Trophy Hunting has placed advertisements outside parliament and train stations saying that Clark, 46, is ‘one of Britain’s most prolific serial killers’ and ‘still on the loose’. Pictured: One of the group’s advertisements on a van outside the Houses of Parliament

Meanwhile, lawmakers will begin to debate a bill that aims to ban the importation of hunting trophies into Britain.

If it becomes law, the bill – introduced by Tory MP Henry Smith – would prevent hunters from bringing back animal skins, severed heads and carcasses to the UK after shootings abroad.

The government has promised a ban for years, but has not given a timetable.

But British trophy hunters have defended their involvement, saying the money flows back into the economies of the countries where they hunt.

But animal rights activists continue to condemn the practice and support the government’s campaign to ban the import.

Among those urging MPs to support the bill is explorer Sir Ranulph Fiennes, who previously called on the leadership to ‘put an end to this sick blood sport’.

Actor Sir David Jason, chimpanzee expert Dame Jane Goodall and poet Benjamin Zephaniah are also said to support the legislation.

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