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Rental Sydney: Landlord gives tenant a mini dishwasher instead of repairing a normal machine

Landlord slams for mind-boggling ‘repair’ of tenant’s broken dishwasher that costs $100 more than the real thing and doesn’t even fit on a plate

  • A landlord’s attempt to “fix” a broken dishwasher in a rental has blown up online
  • Mini dishwasher was given as a replacement, tenant claimed ‘it won’t fit a plate’
  • Users online are shocked by the incident and are sharing stories from landlords
  • Desperate Sydneysider faces increasing housing shortages and skyrocketing rents

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A Sydney tenant desperate for a repair to his broken dishwasher was instead met with a furious alternative when his landlord bought a tiny table top machine that couldn’t even fit dishes in its place.

The renter shared photos of the mini dishwasher on Twitter, showing it sitting on its kitchen bench and struggling to fit every kind of dishware or glassware.

‘During peak rent in the news in Sydney, my landlord decided that instead of fixing the broken dishwasher (since I moved in!) she wrote tenant.

The tenant continued to share his displeasure in the comments, joking “you have to manually fill it with water like a farmer.”

Viewers criticized the incident online, saying the landlord’s actions were “stingy.”

The ‘fix’ was a dishwasher (pictured) that was too small to even fit on a plate, according to the tweet

One commenter pointed to the irony of the situation, revealing that the landlord could have saved $100 if they had just paid for a regular size.

Online, the mini table top dishwasher retails for $427, while a full-size freestanding dishwasher costs $384.

The mini dishwasher is advertised as a ‘game changer in the world of table top dishwashers’, touting its feature of not needing a ‘water connection to operate’.

It can hold a plate with a diameter of up to 22.5 cm, while a standard dinner plate has a diameter of 25 cm.

Users online were shocked by the mini dishwasher and expressed confusion over the 'solution'

Users online were shocked by the mini dishwasher and expressed confusion over the 'solution'

Users online were shocked by the mini dishwasher and expressed confusion over the ‘solution’

The mini dishwasher retails for $427

The mini dishwasher retails for $427

The regular dishwasher costs $384

The regular dishwasher costs $384

The mini dishwasher retails for nearly half a grand, significantly more than a regular size

One user commented, “When we say Eat the Rich…we definitely always mean all the landlords,” with another joking response, “Just don’t eat them off big plates – because they won’t fit in the tiny dishwasher.”

The hilarious riddle of the Sydney tenant inspired other tenants to tell their own horror stories.

‘It took my landlord years to replace the stove and then it was the cheapest on the market. I paid over $130,000 in rent,” one person wrote.

Another said, “A friend’s landlord bought a new one [dishwasher]had it installed in his house and gave their old one to the tenant’.

The landlord refused to clean the dishwasher and then billed the rental home address for the installation cost so they could “declare it on his tax return,” the commenter wrote.

On average, rents in Australia have risen 10.3 percent since the start of 2022, with low housing supply and the reopening of borders contributing to the tightness.

The rental market in Australia is more competitive than ever, but especially in Sydney, where hopeful renters regularly queue at the hundreds of properties.

The national rental vacancy rate is at a record low of 0.9 percent, according to research data from Domein.

A recent photo taken in Bondi, in eastern Sydney, showed applicants queuing in front of a house to inspect it.

This photo of an overcrowded public inspection in Bondi (pictured) sums up Sydney's dire rental crisis, as desperate tenants compete for property

This photo of an overcrowded public inspection in Bondi (pictured) sums up Sydney's dire rental crisis, as desperate tenants compete for property

This photo of an overcrowded public inspection in Bondi (pictured) sums up Sydney’s dire rental crisis, as desperate tenants compete for property

At the start of 2020, across Australia, 41.8 per cent of advertised rental properties on realestate.com.au were under $400 per week, according to research firm PropTrack.

But by September of this year, that figure had fallen to just 19.3 percent.

Rental listings in the capital of less than $400 a week were just 16.4 percent in September, compared to 36.1 percent in March 2020.

In Sydney, weekly rents rose an average of 10 percent year-on-year in the September quarter, with the average house rent rising to $640 and the average rent per unit rising to $520 per week.

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