Take a fresh look at your lifestyle.

- Advertisement -

Richneck boy, 6, who shot teacher, threatened to burn and kill another year earlier

Boy, 6, who shot teacher at Virginia school ‘previously threatened to set fire to and kill another teacher, barricade doors and throw furniture – but elementary school dismissed complaints

  • The unnamed boy shot and killed teacher Abigail Zwerner in class on Jan. 6
  • Other teachers complained to Richneck Elementary that he was violent
  • He sent a note saying he hated her and wanted to see her ‘burn and die’

<!–

<!–

<!– <!–

<!–

<!–

<!–

The six-year-old boy who shot his elementary school teacher in Virginia previously threatened to set fire to and kill another teacher, threw furniture across the classroom and even barricaded a door, but school officials dismissed staff complaints.

The Washington Post cites messages between teachers and staff at Richneck Elementary School in Newport News detailing how the faculty — including Abigail Zwerner, the teacher who was shot — had complained about the child.

On January 6, the child brought a gun into the classroom and shot Zwerner in the abdomen. She survived, but spent three weeks in hospital recovering.

The unnamed boy shot and killed teacher Abigail Zwerner (pictured) in class on Jan. 6. She was finally released from the hospital this week after three weeks

School officials had been told that day that he had a gun, but allowed him to attend class after searching his backpack and failing to find it.

Neither the boy nor his family have been identified. They claimed in a statement released to the press through a lawyer that he has an “acute disability,” meaning he must be accompanied in class by a parent.

On the day in question, he had been allowed to go to school alone, with a 9mm pistol legally owned by his family.

In the immediate aftermath of the shooting, other teachers slammed the school online, saying Zwerner had asked for help “many times” throughout the year.

Another teacher also went to the school to report receiving a note from the child saying he “hated her” and wanted to set her on fire to “watch her die.”

On another occasion, other children had to hide under their desks when the boy started throwing furniture around the classroom.

Newport News Superintendent Steve Drew, right, and Newport News Superintendent George Parker answer questions about a teacher being shot.  No charges have been filed yet, but the investigation is ongoing

Newport News Superintendent Steve Drew, right, and Newport News Superintendent George Parker answer questions about a teacher being shot.  No charges have been filed yet, but the investigation is ongoing

Newport News Superintendent Steve Drew, right, and Newport News Superintendent George Parker answer questions about a teacher being shot. No charges have been filed yet, but the investigation is ongoing

Students and police gather outside Richneck Elementary School after a shooting on Friday, January 6

Students and police gather outside Richneck Elementary School after a shooting on Friday, January 6

Students and police gather outside Richneck Elementary School after a shooting on Friday, January 6

Parents are outraged that teachers' concerns were ignored by school officials.  Above the day of the recordings

Parents are outraged that teachers' concerns were ignored by school officials.  Above the day of the recordings

Parents are outraged that teachers’ concerns were ignored by school officials. Above the day of the recordings

In a third incident, he barricaded the classroom door to prevent staff or students from entering or leaving.

Teachers have also shared how overstretched resources at the school prevented the boy from getting the special attention he needed. On some occasions he was found wandering the halls alone.

In their statement, the boy’s family said he had undergone a care plan, which normally meant one of his parents was with him every day.

That plan ended a week before the shooting.

“We will regret our absence on this day for the rest of our lives,” they said.

The damning reports come after it was revealed that the school had even received a tip that he had a gun on him on the day in question, and they searched his backpack but found nothing and let him go on with his day.

School officials have declined to share more details about the shocking incident, citing privacy laws that prevent them from discussing the child’s record.

Zwerner was released from hospital earlier this week.

Police continue to investigate the incident. No one has yet been charged.

Leave A Reply

Your email address will not be published.